Using four-wheel drive Since the Jeep Wrangler, the Ford Bronco is perhaps the most thrilling off-road vehicle.

The Bronco, which is available in both two- and four-door body designs, was created to do everything a Wrangler can—and even more.

Yes, just like a Wrangler, the Bronco's doors can be removed, but only the Ford keeps its mirrors.

The SUVs from both brands are designed to handle large puddles, however the Bronco suffers from substantially less road noise when cruising between puddles.

With output ranging from a 330-hp twin-turbo 2.7-liter V-6 to a 300-hp turbocharged 2.3-liter inline-four, it boasts greater basic horsepower as well.

If you're looking for more, check out the 418-hp Bronco Raptor's bloated fenders.

The Bronco offers tremendous configurability with a bewildering assortment of models, trims, and extra equipment that enables it to meet a variety of purposes.

The 300-hp turbo 2.3-liter in the Bronco Heritage Edition is paired with either a seven-speed manual or an optional 10-speed automatic transmission.

There aren't eight cylinders in the Bronco. Instead, a 2.3-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine with 300 horsepower is standard, and a 2.7-liter twin-turbo V-6 engine with 330 horsepower is optional.

Both gas engines can be connected to a 10-speed automatic transmission, while a seven-speed manual transmission can only be used with the smaller engine.

Ford Bronco vehicles with two and four doors have the same 3500-pound towing capacity as the Wrangler.

The most economical Bronco has a four-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission, with ratings of 20 mpg in the city and 22 mpg on the interstate.

The most economical Bronco has a four-cylinder engine and an automatic transmission, with ratings of 20 mpg in the city and 22 mpg on the interstate.