Bob Renner beeps a field in a biplane during one scene in Out of Africa before thudding to the ground and taxiing up to his shocked love interest, Meryl Streep.

The first Z-car, which was speedy, light, and stylish in 1969, captivated the attention of sports car lovers everywhere.

With a nearly ballistic rush, the 240Z took off, sending its challengers quaking in their tire chocks.

Nissan, however, wasted its well-earned dynamic reputation from the middle of the 1970s until the middle of the 1980s. Its athletic models became glam

Nissan had slipped to third place amongst imports in U.S. auto sales by 1988. Luckily, the new Nissan managers had already started trimming the lineup's saggy foundations and blasé bodywork.

The 240SX is Nissan, and this is the present. In contrast to the 200SX it replaces, the new 240 is a car to lust after despite not being related to the original.

Anyone who enjoys the handling of an automobile, which includes all of us who have our hands on the wheel and our feet itching for a thrill

The 240's exterior features, including its voluminous lines and superb interior, highlight Nissan's revived excitement.

Instead of the 6-cylinder V-6 or four-cylinder turbo of the 200SX, it has a new 2.4-liter, naturally aspirated, twelve-valve engine.

Nissan's designers may well have managed to learn flying over night, but they were not born yesterday. The SX elegantly hides the new engine while being lower in weight and having greater handling.

Nissan's new managers wisely insisted on keeping the fundamental rear-drive design of the 200SX. Making the most of it is a redesigned rear suspension on the 240.

The new suspension system, which is similar to the one chosen for the upcoming 300ZX, easily offers almost any balance of stability and agility Nissan chooses.

Anyone who enjoys the handling of an automobile, which includes all of us who have our hands on the wheel and our feet itching for a thrill